Think Twice When Choosing Skin Care Products as Gifts for Kids with JA

Think Twice When Choosing Skin Care Products as Gifts for Kids with JA

As I searched online for Christmas presents for my loved ones recently, I browsed selections of pre-made gift kits. Many of them were bath or skin care based. I saw adorable bubble bath sets for children, makeup and nail kits, and baskets of soaps and creams marketed to young men and women.

Skin care products can make lovely gifts. I bought a unicorn tumbler full of bath bombs for my young cousin. But as I shopped, I thought about how I wouldn’t buy gifts like these for myself. As someone with juvenile-onset psoriatic arthritis, I would worry that they might flare my skin. I realized many of these gifts wouldn’t be suitable for kids or young adults with juvenile rheumatic conditions.

Additionally, conditions such as systemic arthritis, dermatomyositis, scleroderma, psoriatic arthritis, and lupus can cause rashes, lesions, and other skin issues, which can be further irritated by skin care products.

Consider quality

Those with skin conditions can’t usually tolerate the ingredients used in pre-made bath sets and makeup kits. Items such as bath bombs are not recommended for those with particular skin conditions. Other products may be drying and irritating to those with sensitive or inflamed skin. 

But that doesn’t mean you have to avoid giving pampering gifts altogether. Many kids with juvenile arthritis benefit from the soothing effects of a warm bath and the confidence boost of wearing makeup. Instead, when choosing a gift, consider the product’s quality.

Ask first

If you’re thinking of giving soaps, makeup, and lotions as gifts don’t be afraid to ask the child’s parents which products they use. And stick to those brands. Don’t be misled by product labels containing words like “natural,” “healing,” or even “psoriasis-friendly.” While the claims might be valid, it’s best to stick to products that the family already trusts — the brands they use are likely either doctor recommended or they’ve discovered them after much trial and error.

Quality trumps quantity

Quality is essential for those living with chronic skin conditions. Don’t be surprised if the products and brands that the person uses are a little expensive. You don’t need to break your budget, but remember that it’s better to choose quality over quantity. A trusted eye shadow palette with one or two colors is worth much more than another with multiple shades that may irritate the skin.

Other gift ideas

You might also consider gifting skin care accessories such as makeup brushes or sponges, or a cosmetic bag to keep products in.

You could put together a custom-made bath kit. For younger kids, a bath caddy filled with bath toys and crayons, a hooded towel, a brush and comb, and fun, colored puffs. Older kids and teens might prefer bathrobes, slippers, eye pillows, spa socks, and candles or essential oils. I like this idea because you can pick and choose each item and customize it to the recipient.

It’s the thought that counts

I’ve received lots of bath and beauty products in the past. Many of them came from my parents, who knew how careful I needed to be with skin products. I’m always extremely appreciative of the lotions, makeup, and perfumes they gift, particularly as they can be pricey.

Sometimes I’ve received products that I didn’t feel comfortable using. But I accepted them with a smile and a genuine “thank you.” I’m grateful for the gift of someone thinking of me, taking the time to buy me a gift, and wrap it up. 

***

Note: Juvenile Arthritis News is strictly a news and information website about the disease. It does not provide medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. This content is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read on this website. The opinions expressed in this column are not those of Juvenile Arthritis News, or its parent company, BioNews Services, and are intended to spark discussion about issues pertaining to juvenile arthritis.

Elizabeth Medeiros is a young adult who has dealt with juvenile arthritis since she was a small child. However, her pain hasn’t stopped her from working on a product design degree in Boston. Her passion is to create products that make life easier for the chronically ill, such as shoes and walking canes. When she’s not in class, Elizabeth enjoys writing about how she’s coped with arthritis at such a young age. You can find more of her writings at ArthritisGirl.Blogspot.com and on Instagram @GirlWithArthritis.
×
Elizabeth Medeiros is a young adult who has dealt with juvenile arthritis since she was a small child. However, her pain hasn’t stopped her from working on a product design degree in Boston. Her passion is to create products that make life easier for the chronically ill, such as shoes and walking canes. When she’s not in class, Elizabeth enjoys writing about how she’s coped with arthritis at such a young age. You can find more of her writings at ArthritisGirl.Blogspot.com and on Instagram @GirlWithArthritis.

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *