Children with Systemic JIA Should Be Monitored Closely for Signs of Lung Disease, Study Urges

Children with Systemic JIA Should Be Monitored Closely for Signs of Lung Disease, Study Urges

Parents and physicians should be on the lookout for subtle signs of lung disease in children with systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis, a study has found.

The study results, “Emergent high fatality lung disease in systemic juvenile arthritis,” were published in the Annals of Rheumatic Diseases.

Systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis (sJIA) is the most severe type of juvenile arthritis (JA) and is characterized by widespread tissue inflammation that affects not only patients’ joints, but also organs and glands.

“The usual pulmonary complications of sJIA are pleuritis and pleural effusion. However, in the last decade, pediatric rheumatologists have increasingly detected cases with types of LDs [lung diseases] rarely seen in sJIA previously, [including] pulmonary arterial hypertension (64%), interstitial LD (28%) and pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP) (20%),” the researchers wrote.

Researchers from Stanford University and their collaborators carried out a retrospective study to analyze the clinical features of children with sJIA who developed parenchymal lung disease (LD) to look for potential risk factors and early signs of the disorder setting in.

The multi-center retrospective study involved 61 children with sJIA and parenchymal LD, who were identified through the Childhood Arthritis and Rheumatology Research Alliance (CARRA) network and the international pediatric rheumatology listserv ( administered by McMaster University, Ontario). A larger group of 471 children with sJIA without LD was used as a reference for comparison.

Medical history, clinical and demographic data were assessed in all children and compared between those who developed parenchymal LD (36 children) and those who did not (25 children).

Results showed that LD was associated with poor survival, with only 42% of the children remaining alive five years after being diagnosed.

In addition, they found that LD seemed to be linked to certain unusual characteristics, including having acute clubbing (enlargement of the fingers or toes, 61%), skin rashes (56%), abdominal pain (16%), or having frequent anaphylactic (allergic) reactions to certain medications such as tocilizumab (38%).

Further analyses also showed that children who developed parenchymal LD tended to have higher blood levels of ferritin (an indicator of inflammation) and lower levels of white blood cells (approximately less than 60% of what would be expected for their age) before being diagnosed with the disease.

“Increased ferritin and lymphopenia [low white blood cell counts] before LD diagnosis suggest a possibly extended incubation phase associated with smouldering inflammation and/or delayed recognition of LD,” the researchers wrote.

Tissue analyses performed in the 36 children who developed parenchymal LD demonstrated the most frequent disorders they developed were pulmonary alveolar proteinosis and/or endogenous lipoid pneumonia (PAP/ELP), which are rare disorders caused by the accumulation of surfactants and fatty molecules in the lungs, respectively.

Although PAP/ELP often are associated with macrophage activation syndrome (MAS), a condition caused by the over-activation of a type of immune cells called macrophages, no direct relationship was found between MAS and LD features in these children.

Investigators also found that having Down syndrome and being very young when experiencing the first symptoms of sJIA (being younger than five years of age), increased the risks of LD in children with sJIA. Exposure to certain medications (e.g., interleukin-1 and interleukin-6 inhibitors) also seemed to be associated with certain characteristics of LD.

“[I]n children with risk factors, close attention to subtle pulmonary symptoms is advised, and approaches for early detection of altered pulmonary function, guided by a pulmonary specialist, should be considered. In light of high fatality, efforts to determine LD prevalence, uncover molecular mechanism(s), and devise treatment and prevention approaches are urgently needed,” the researchers wrote.

Joana is currently completing her PhD in Biomedicine and Clinical Research at Universidade de Lisboa. She also holds a BSc in Biology and an MSc in Evolutionary and Developmental Biology from Universidade de Lisboa. Her work has been focused on the impact of non-canonical Wnt signaling in the collective behavior of endothelial cells — cells that make up the lining of blood vessels — found in the umbilical cord of newborns.
Total Posts: 11
Ana holds a PhD in Immunology from the University of Lisbon and worked as a postdoctoral researcher at Instituto de Medicina Molecular (iMM) in Lisbon, Portugal. She graduated with a BSc in Genetics from the University of Newcastle and received a Masters in Biomolecular Archaeology from the University of Manchester, England. After leaving the lab to pursue a career in Science Communication, she served as the Director of Science Communication at iMM.
×
Joana is currently completing her PhD in Biomedicine and Clinical Research at Universidade de Lisboa. She also holds a BSc in Biology and an MSc in Evolutionary and Developmental Biology from Universidade de Lisboa. Her work has been focused on the impact of non-canonical Wnt signaling in the collective behavior of endothelial cells — cells that make up the lining of blood vessels — found in the umbilical cord of newborns.
Latest Posts
  • systemic JIA, lung disease
  • gut microbiome
  • Arava
  • pain sensitivity, JIA

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *